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Inch&Co builds a business that gives their employees and family a life to be proud of

Inch&Co builds a business that gives their employees and family a life to be proud of

  • Brothers John Jr. and Jeff spent their early years growing up in a trailer park, with four siblings to one bedroom. Their experience motivates them today.
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John Inch Jr. remembers the nights when he and his three siblings would squeeze into the single bedroom of their parent’s trailer. He spent the first 12 years of his life watching his parents struggle.

And while John knows his younger brother, Jeff, doesn’t always like when he talks about their humble beginnings, the two agree: their upbringing made them who they are today.

“That kind of experience motivates us,” John says. “You don’t go through that and not want to make something better for yourself, your family, your employees.”

We’ve always been motivated to help everyone around us pursue their own dreams,” John Inch Jr. says.

A family of businesses

Jeff’s vision for his business starts with a blank slate. He looks at a plot of land — empty but ready for potential. He can picture the house that will occupy the space, the landscaping that dots the outside, the furniture that sets the atmosphere, and the family that will one day make memories inside.

All of that comes to life with the Inch family of business. The eight brands, all unique but connected, include:

  • Inch and Co. Construction
  • Inch and Co. Real Estate
  • Hueter’s Greenhouses
  • Gray Apple Market
  • Gray Apple Design
  • Inch and Co. Landscape Division
  • Inch’s Natural Lawn Care
  • Inch and Co. Property Management. 

Sarah Inch, Jeff’s wife, started helping Inch&Co with interiors projects, which led to the launch of Gray Apple Market and Gray Apple Design. Not only does she bring her unique design skills to client projects, but she hosts annual festivals that supports other small businesses.

“Our growth over the years has led to the success of so many other ventures,” she says. “That’s something we take very seriously, and we know that it takes all of us supporting one another to create a healthy sense of community.”

Making progress

While Inch&Co has projects in Mechanicsburg, Jacobus, and Mount Wolf, they’re also expanding into Virginia, North Carolina, and Tennessee. Their real estate arm recently moved into the 183-year-old Elmwood Mansion off Interstate 83 in Springettsbury Township, giving the business an even more visible presence.

But none of these things have come to be because Jeff planned them.

“I’ve never been one to write down goals,” he admits. “I just wake up every day and try to make progress. When you have that mentality, it’s great to look back over the years and see how far you’ve come.”

As Inch&Co continues to grow, the founders look for opportunities to bring others into their success. They’re building out an investment model that would allow their employees and close family members to be even more involved in the business.

“We’ve always been motivated to help everyone around us pursue their own dreams,” John says. “We’re here to build a business that gives back to our employees and supports those who have always supported us.”

Los colores fluorescentes fluyen del pincel de Claudia Salazar para cubrir el swoosh de un par de Nikes. El espacio blanco se llena de azul, rosa y amarillo.

Nacida en Perú, pero residente en York desde hace ocho años, Salazar crea artículos que reflejan la vibrante herencia hispana que ha llevado consigo a través de los continentes.

Pero los hermosos colores que pone en un lienzo, en camisetas, en zapatillas o incluso en chaquetas de cuero son algo más que una representación de su origen: son un signo de su curación y de la vida que puede surgir del trauma.

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